My top 5 time management books

Tim Ferriss holding up a copy of his book, 'The 4 Hour Work Week'. Img src: http://farm1.staticflickr.com/194/467512232_0f773439cc_z.jpg?zz=1
Tim Ferriss holding up a copy of his book, ‘The 4 Hour Work Week’.

Time management books worth your time

In my quest for self improvement and in the lead up to writing my book, Time to Start, I read dozens of time management books. Not all of them were worth the time to read!

There were a select few, however, which were worth the time and worth their weight in gold. I would have liked to include more but I have narrowed it down to my top 5 time management books.

I believe if you read these books and out what they teach into practice, you will be well on your way to mastering your productivity and your own time management skills.

“The question you should be asking isn’t, “What do I want?” or “What are my goals?” but “What would excite me?”
― Timothy Ferriss, The 4-Hour Workweek   

  1. The 4 Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss: Tim challenges conventional time management wisdom and questions everything you think you know about productivity. If you’re working 9-5 and want to escape the rat race, I suggest you start with this book. Tim’s book is a cheat guide of sorts, for the modern executive or entrepreneur.
  2. The Seven Day Weekend by Ricardo Semler: I remember first reading about Ricardo Semler and his company, Semco, while I was studying business. Ricardo was a pioneer in creating a true democracy in his company. He is extremely passionate about achieving the work life balance and helping his employees do the same. There are those who say work life balance can’t be achieved and then there’s people like Ricardo Semler, who continue to show the world it can be done.
  3. The 5 Choices by Kory Kogon, Adam Merrill and Leena Rinne: The 5 Choices is a simple book, which gives you a clear framework, so you can get back in control of your time. The authors do a great job of explaining concepts borrowed from Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and apply them to emerging challenges around technology and information overload.
  4. The 80/20 Manager by Richard Koch: This book is a follow on from The 80/20 Principle and is extremely well written. In this book, Koch uses some great examples of where most managers and executives invest their time and explains that around 80 percent of their efforts show very few results. He goes on to outline 10 ways managers (and leaders) can be more effective by focusing on the 20 percent of efforts that deliver 80 percent of results.
  5. The Power of Less by Leo Babauta: Babauta’s book teaches the art of simplicity. Babauta is a minimalist and his book will teach you how to limit yourself to the essential in business and in life. While some aspects of minimalism are a bit extreme for me, I have certainly borrowed and applied plenty of ideas from this book. Worth a read.

For some people, the idea of taking the time to read time management books is counterintuitive. I believe if you invest time in reading these books, and put what you learn into practice, you will get your time back and more.

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